Posts byPaintingBohemia.org Staff

“A Little Cloud”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION This chapter is representation of a man who feels as though he is not only small but also unimportant, leaving no impact behind similar to a puff of smoke dissipating into the air. This is essentially the inner turmoil that consumes Little Chandler in this story. Just like how clouds and transparent and dissipate to
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“Ivy Day in the Committee Room”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION his chapter demonstrates how the different opinions of nationalism and class vary throughout Ireland’s diverse demographics. One of the biggest divides in Irish society seen in this short story was the gap between generations. The old generation, highlighted by Chris Parnell, who is the man honored in Ivy Day, had so much more conviction and vigor
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“Clay”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION  Clay, Maria is a maid of Catholic faith that worked in a Protestant charity. The chapter specifically describes her day off, which consisted of a trip to the city to buy some sweets and a visit to her friend Joe. During the period described in the story, Ireland wasn’t its own independent country and
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“The Boarding House”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION his chapter illustrates how different classes intermingle and the strain that class can have on personal relationships. In Polly and Mr. Doran’s relationship there are organic emotions of attraction pitted against the exterior interests that are related to class and social mobility. Polly the daughter of Mrs. Mooney, the Madam at the boarding house, develops
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“Counterparts”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION he story of “Counterparts” introduces the character Farrington, a modest scrivener for the attorneys Alleyne and Crosbie. The story chronicles the fall of this lower-middle class man who represents the whole of Ireland. His alcoholism puts him at odds with both his employers as well as his Catholic family. He does not respect his
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“The Sisters”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION oyce pushes on the theme of this sudden awareness of a different and distinct adult world by hyperbolizing the motif of paralysis.  The opening scene begins with the image of the narrator gazing through a window reflecting the word “paralysis.” This reinforces the sense of quiet and detached observation of the narrator that the
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“Araby”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION onditions in Dublin for the working and lower class were notoriously poor and regarded as one of  the worse in the British Empire. Many families lived in one room tenements and had little hope for a better life due to the evident class divide and the fact the rich cared little for the rest
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“After the Race, An Alternate Take”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION he streets of Dublin, doubling as an eclectic melting pot of European society, play host to a race welcoming Germans, French, and Americans alike. The streets are a place where the atmosphere of a lively, diverse, and exorbitantly wealthy bunch disguises a deep-set sense of longing for personal (and monetary) gain. Young Jimmy Doyle
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“Two Gallants”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION  this chapter of Dubliners, two young thieves plot to convince a maid to rob a wealthy estate for their personal benefit. They are ironically deemed “gallants” to highlight their lack of honor despite their success in the robbery. This chapter can be analyzed through the lenses of three major themes: Public vs. private spaces, class structure/struggle, and
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“A Painful Case”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION ames Joyce’s excerpt “A Painful Case” in Dubliners tells a short story of a lonely man in Dublin in the 20th century. As with the other stories depicted in Dubliners, each account gives the reader insight into life in Dublin during the period. In the beginning of the 20th century, Ireland was in the
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“The Encounter”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION hat can one draw from James Joyce’s Dublinite literature? Joyce, a writer often known for drawing every existing droplet of meaning from any action, often slips social commentary into the most normalized setting. In the case of “Encounters” from Dubliners, Joyce expands on the human need for wanderlust; centering his story on three Irish boys
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“A Mother”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION he main characters of the story are Mrs. Kearney and her daughter Kathleen. Kathleen is invited to perform at a set of concerts, and signs a contract before them. She is promised to be paid a certain amount of money before each concert. But as the concerts proceed her contract is changed for the
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“Eveline”

The Dubliners Project

INTRODUCTION he agony that Eveline Hill faces in deciding whether or not to pursue the love of her life, Frank, is reflective of the choices that young women in early 20th century faced throughout Europe, and especially in Ireland. While previous generations of women clung to preconceived notions of what the societal role of a
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