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The Honest Image: ‘Garry Winogrand,’ a Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum

The Garry Winogrand exhibit, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City until September 21st, displays the post-war era in America through the lens of an excited yet anxious “street” photographer. In his photographs, Winogrand captures both his own anxious energy and the energy of the time. The economic boom in
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Challenging Our Food Ethic: From Isolation to Alliance

s one who studies the politics, ethics, technology, science, and history behind the vastly interdisciplinary field of environmentalism, I can tell you firsthand that we “tree-hugging hippies” are often seen as outsiders—or what Edward Said describes as “the Other.” While recent national polls show that nearly 60% of the American public believes that the environment
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Wifredo Lam: The Modern Day Avant-Garde

sually hanging up at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is The Jungle, a famous piece by artist Wifredo Lam. This masterpiece usually hangs alongside Picasso’s Les Demoiselle d’Avignon. The placement of these two pieces seems fitting, as Picasso had a major influence on Lam’s work, and helped shape him into a modern day avant-garde painter. Lam, an Afro-Cuban painter,
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The Brooklyn Barbie

ntroducing Brooklyn Barbie: With a cozy beanie atop her tousled tresses she is ready for a crisp fall afternoon in Williamsburg! She wears thick-framed glasses, pre-muddied combat boots, and a worn out flannel. Each Barbie wears a unique t-shirt with an ironic, provocative statement on it. She is radical, rebellious, and different from all other
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Potatoes for the People: Addressing Food Insecurity in New York City

he USDA defines the term “food insecurity” as having a “lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members” and “limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.” At present, this sad reality describes many New Yorkers. In Manhattan, for example, the food insecurity rate is an
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Balancing Two Identities: What it Means to be Chinese in the United States

trategically located between Centre and Lafayette Street in New York City, the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) faces both cultural Chinatown and Little Italy. While the museum is inside of an early 1900’s industrial building, the sustainable materials used to create the space and interior architecture reflect the fusion of history and modernity. The
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Dependence and Influence: A Look into Artists’ Relationships with Intoxicants

ady Gaga, while recording her newest album, ARTPOP (2013), hinted that she had used various kinds of drugs to help boost her creativity. Multiple songs on her album allude to drug use – some subtly, others explicitly (“Mary Jane Holland,” “Dope,” and “Jewels n’ Drugs”). In an interview with Elvis Duran, the host of U.S.
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The Sea of Green: A Closer Look at a Rooftop Farm and Restaurant in New York’s Greenwich Village

Expectation sought out Rosemary’s, an Italian restaurant in the West Village, for its rooftop garden and locavore-friendly fare. As a vegetarian and gardener myself, I must admit my weakness for these types of modern, local foodie establishments and penchant for paying the often high premium that comes with them. My short walk from the subway
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An Independent Bookstore Manifesto: Let Them Read Books

noppressive and Non-Imperialist Bargain Books, located on 34 Carmine St in the West Village, is a bookstore for the people. It arms the sans-culottes of New York City with intellectual weaponry that they don’t need to purchase through imperialistic companies. The bookstore’s website declares its mission: “NYC-based specialty bargain bookstore dealing in highly curated art,
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Appreciating vs. Appropriating in Harlem: Where to Draw the Line

ppropriation of a given culture’s art, music, and space is often viewed as inappropriate appropriation when it is done disingenuously. Aspects of a given group in society can be culturally appropriated (i.e. music, art, traditions, customs) as well as spatially appropriated. Unwanted infiltration and appropriation of another culture’s “space” happens constantly in many urban, ethnic
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A West Side Story: Making Lincoln Center What It Is Today

alking through Lincoln Center today, one is surrounded by endless artistic venues such as theaters, art galleries, dancing schools, and performing arts clubs. Lincoln Center is home to household names such as the Juilliard School for the Performing Arts, the Walter Reade Theater, the Metropolitan Opera House, Fordham University, and the David Rubenstein Atrium. Every
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Confronting Fordham: S.A.G.E.S.’ Fight for Healthcare and Free Speech

ntil recently, students at Fordham University knew Fordham SAGES (Students for Sex and Gender Equity and Safety) primarily for the “condom drops” they have been conducting since the beginning of the school year. But at the beginning of the month, the previously-anonymous group went public as they delivered a petition with over 1,200 student signatures
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Kingsbridge Armory a Form of Gentrification or a Beneficial Addition to the Community?

In Anthony Bourdain’s television series “Parts Unknown”, he recently did an exposé on the Bronx, and its origin. In this particular episode, he starts off by commenting on how “the Bronx is a magical place with its own energy, food, and rhythm”.  (cnn.com). He even goes on to further mention in his episode that the Bronx
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Is it worth it?: The MET’s Opera “The Death of Klinghoffer”

pproximately one year from now will be the 30th year since Leon Klinghoffer was killed in a terrorist attack.   Klinghoffer was a victim of the 1985 Achille Lauro cruise ship hijacking, which was the subject matter of one the New York Metropolitan Opera’s more recent productions, “The Death of Klinghoffer.” The opera was based on
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Bodegas and Arab Identity: ناس للغة العربية

odegas are somewhat unique to New York City. Historically, they began in Spanish speaking neighborhoods but have now spread across the entire city. The bodega carries the essentials needed for everyday urban life. They carry everything from toiletries and sandwiches to cigarettes and beer. Due to the fast paced nature of New York City, the
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Growing Up Bronx: 1940s-50s

Part 1 of 2

In order to garner a more complete understanding of the ‘White Flight’ of the mid-twentieth century, I chose a familiar primary source. Born and raised as a Bronxite, my own grandmother Sue Ann Heaney grew up on Taylor Avenue nestled between the Bronx River Parkway and the Bruckner Expressway. Heaney began her own family in
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Valerie Solanas: More Than Just A Crazy Chick Who Tried To Kill Warhol

alerie Solanas’ SCUM Manifesto is a work that, upon one’s first reading, elicits disgust, dread, and fear. On the surface, this text seems like the rantings of a delusional woman who hated all men indiscriminately for very personal and illogical reasons. Though many consider her the catalyst and a hero of the radical feminist movement, radical
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Freedom of Fertility: Improving Diversity at Tech Giants

ith the dramatic rise in tech and internet oriented companies, the lack of transparency regarding race and gender demographics have become more obvious. Software engineering and similar professions have been, and remain, historically male dominated. Google recently released internal diversity statistics, which revealed that eighty three percent of its tech employees are male. This is
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PBL presents: “A Childish Night”

Tuesday, 16 December, 6 p.m.: Flom Auditorium

Painting Bohemian Lives presents a night exploring the art of Childish Gambino. Come listen to the album, read the screenplay, and watch associated videos, exploring the way that Donald Glover crosses mediums and takes on social issues. Date: 16 December 2014 Time: 6 PM Place: Flom Auditorium in the Walsh Library (Fordham University—Rose Hill) RSVP at
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The Emmas: Aggression and Feminism Now and Then

Emma Goldman Quoted for saying “Heaven must be an awfully dull place if the poor in spirit live there”, Emma Goldman was an infamous rebel and spitfire anarchist in the late 1800s and early 1900s (Goldman). Goldman was a famous activist who fought vigorously for free speech, gender equality, birth control and labor unions. 1893-1919
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Beyond Fordham Road: City Island’s Crisis

See a google map of our walk at https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=zh606ZkPWN0U.kmQr5i0E1AKA Setting the Scene When picturing the Bronx, the beautiful town of City Island does not seem to match the description that those unfamiliar with the New York City borough might have; in fact, City Island defies those expectations. The town is clean, friendly, and surrounded by nature.
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New York City’s “Rite of Passage” into Manhood

n American society, getting a driver’s license is much more symbolic than what is displayed on the three-and-a-half inch, laminated card.  Getting a driver’s license is a rite of passage for most teenage Americans.  A license provides freedom from parents, freedom to get a job, and the freedom to explore.  Even driving to a nearby
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COCO CHANEL: The Woman Ahead of Her Time

The history behind the woman who revolutionized simple elegance.

HANEL is a label that has been internationally recognized for decades, known for the famous quilted bag and tweed jacket. What is lesser known about Chanel is the woman behind it, Gabrielle (Coco) Chanel and her passion for empowering women through what they wear. She was able to break the boundaries between men’s and women’s-wear
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Bohemianism, Politics, and Violence in Italian Futurism

n the popular imagination, bohemia is associated with left-leaning politics just as often as innovative artwork; between poets drinking absinthe and hippies shouting for free love, one can find countless historical examples to reinforce this view. Many of the most famous and innovative bohemians, such as American blues legend Bessie Smith, hail from marginalized groups,
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Philadelphia Murals: Street Culture or Bourgeois Invasion?

 brief drive through Philadelphia can often seem like a veritable urban art museum; it is impossible to travel far through the old brownstones and run-down neighborhoods without encountering a gigantic piece of street art. Over 3,600 murals are scattered throughout the city today. All colorful, enormous, and impressive, they add life to the area, providing
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War on Christmas

very year, as December inches near, I am overjoyed with excitement about the soon to be celebration of Christmas festivities. Christmas, by far, is my favorite holiday. The joy and holiday spirit that seem to fill the air along Manhattan streets and within local households lifts my mood, and makes me feel cozy and warm
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“Black Crows”: How Rei Kawakubo Revolutionized Fashion and Beauty

Looking back at the influence of Comme des Garçons

oday Rei Kawakubo and her cultural juggernaut of a brand, Comme des Garçons (French for “Like the Boys”), are seen as stable fixtures in the fashion establishment. Her shows are attended by all sorts of celebrities and VIPs, and she boasts loyal legions of fans, one of the most notable being John Waters, the “Pope
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Signs for Change

A Short Series on the December 13 Protests in New York

n my time on this country, I’ve been to and seen dozen of protests, for the most varied causes. Civic engagement seems to be quite the American tradition, and people take to the streets for many, many reasons, from Wendy’s underpaying its tomato workers, to the mammoth issue of anthropogenic climate change. Often, what I’d see
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Portlandia and Its People

A Look at the Creators Behind the Show, the Characters They’ve Created, and the People They Emulate

omedy duo Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein have taken similar paths in life. From punk-rock beginnings to a comedic present; they have both managed to accomplish many noteworthy things that span different genres. Fred Armisen, born on December 4, 1966, grew up in Valley Stream, New York. His music career began in 1988 when he
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Misty Copeland: Changing the Mold for Modern Ballerinas

n its 75-year history, Misty Copeland is only the third female African American soloist of the American Ballet Theater (ABT), and its only current African American soloist. Throughout her entire life as a dancer, she was constantly told that she had the wrong body for ballet. In an art that values history and perfection, Copeland
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An Asian Girl’s Perspective on Childish Gambino’s “Yellow Fever”

“I just didn’t like the politics that came with dating white or black girls… Asian chicks, people are always like ‘Eh.’ Like you’re dating an Asian chick and nobody cares. Also their parents tend to not care… if you’re successful. If you’re successful, they don’t give a shit. They’re like, ‘Oh, he makes movies? He’s
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“I is an Other”: Integration in Astoria, Queens

storia, Queens has recently developed into one of the largest Egyptian immigrant communities in New York City, hence the geographical title “Little Egypt”–one of the many affectionate nicknames ascribed to the neighborhood located at the end of the N and Q subway lines. As a small non-profit headquartered in this international hub, the Center for
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Tibet: No Voice

n recent years, China has been emerging as a major world leader through its massive population and economic growth. China’s extremely massive population has allowed it to grow economically at an alarming rate, which has put it on the fast track to becoming one of the wealthiest nations in the entire world. But this massive
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DeafNYC: Subverting Hegemony with Slam Poetry

he construction of identity is a communal endeavor; we contribute to the identity of ourselves and those we encounter through our attitudes and historical biases.  Stuart Hall discusses identity as “an ever-unfinished conversation.”  Much of his work concerning identity relies on the construction of identity in the context of confrontation of difference.  He speaks to
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Howl: A History

llen Ginsberg is a name that many people stumble across in one English class or another. My first encounter with Ginsberg was in my AP English Literature class in twelfth grade. My teacher had us read “Howl” and then discuss it in class. I had only two thoughts in my mind at the time. Naturally,
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Solidarity in Protest

the Aftermath of the Darren Wilson Grand Jury Decision in New York City

n November 25th after long deliberation, the Grand Jury investigating the now infamous case of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson’s shooting of unarmed black resident Michael Brown, decided not to indict. Since then, numerous protests ranging from nonviolent demonstrations of civil disobedience to destruction of property have unfolded. In New York City, an unorganized protest
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